Cool Pics of Early Movies in Laguna

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Cool Pics of Early Movies in Laguna

 Fisherman’s Cove w/ movie set.

Errol Flynn, during filming of “Captain Blood”. *3 Arch Bay

“Max Sennett: Bathing Beauties”. LB: 1936

1926 Press Photo- Shooting a Scene at Laguna Beach California -The Rough Riders

How do you think Treasure Island got its name (Now the Montage)

“Give Us This Night”

Gladys Swarthout and Jan Kiepura starred in the 1936 Paramount Pictures film “Give Us This Night”, filmed against the cliffs of Shell Cove in Three Arch Bay.
Shell Cove was perfect for the recreation of an Italian fishing village where the story takes place.

 

Slim Summerville

Built in 1925, what is now the Beach House Inn restaurant at 619 Sleepy Hollow, was originally the home of western comedian and actor Slim Summerville. The American character actor, known as the gagman for Mack Sennett, was born George Summerville in 1892. While he played in dozens of movies, he claimed Laguna as his primary home. Some of his most notable film credits include The Beloved Rogue (1927, All Quiet on the Western Front(1930), The Front Page (1931), White Fang (1936) and Tobacco Road (1941).

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The original “Mark of Zoro” (1920) was filmed in San Juan Capistrano.

“Bobbed Hair”

William “Hoppy” Boyd, resident of Laguna, in the 1921 movie “Bobbed Hair.” One of the great things about this promotional still is it also features Laguna’s “Crooked Tree” . This wind-twisted cypress clung tenaciously to a knoll overlooking Arch Beach. This tree has been called the most painted tree in the world and has been seen in several films, such as the mostly forgotten 1922 Forget-Me-Not.

Forester Harvey lived in Laguna Beach. *here he is with Laurel & Hardy in “A Chump at Harvard”.

“Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

filmed in Laguna: 1922

 

“The Queen of Sheba”

Filmed in Laguna in 1921: “The Queen of Sheba” was a silent film produced by Fox studios about the story of the ill-fated romance between Solomon, King of Israel, and the Queen of Sheba. Written and directed by J. Gordon Edwards, it starred Betty Blythe as the Queen and Fritz Leiber, Sr. as King Solomon. The film is well known amongst silent film buffs for the risqué costumes worn by Blythe, as evidenced by several surviving stills taken during the production. This was a rarity in mainstream Hollywood films at the time. Only a short fragment of the film survives.

 

Goff Island: in the ’20’s they installed the walkway on the right so’s they could get movie props out to the island at low tide, then they’d film from shore when the tide was up and it looked like a water surrounded deserted island.

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Peter Pan (1924) was an adventure silent film released by Paramount Pictures, the first film adaptation of the play by J. M. Barrie. It was directed by Herbert Brenon and starred Betty Bronson as Peter Pan, Ernest Torrence as Captain Hook, Mary Brian as Wendy, and Virginia Browne Faire as Tinker Bell. Anna May Wong, a groundbreaking Chinese-American actress, played the Indian princess Tiger Lily. *Trivia: the below scene was filmed at 3 Arch Bay.

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Max Sennett’s “Bad Babes” at 3 Arch Bay. *mid 20’s

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William L. Boyd, aka: “Hopalong Cassidy” lived in Laguna. He passed onto the big rodeo in the sky on 13 Sept 1972 .

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This photo is from an unknown western flick shot along Aliso Creek in the early ’30’s. *we think the guy w/ the sticks in the background is Eiler.

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Mermaids at 3 Arch Bay: “The Water Nymph” was filmed at Three Arch Bay in 1912 starring Mabel Normand and was the first production of the Mack Sennett Comedies, which went on to become the leading silent era film production company. “The Keystone Kops” were continuing characters in Sennett films with Charlie Chaplin and Fatty Arbuckle. Normand (inset) was Sennett’s fiance’ until he had an affair with one of her closest friends a few years after “The Water Nymph”. *Stu News Laguna

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Loretta Young (Photo by: Irving Lippman, Laguna Beach, California). Anybody recognize the beach?

 

 

Woods Cove – Betty Davis’s house

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‘Now, Voyager’, Bette Davis & Paul Henreid at Victor Hugo Inn, 1942.

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“The Queen of Sheba”

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Filmed in Laguna in 1921: “The Queen of Sheba” was a silent film produced by Fox studios about the story of the ill-fated romance between Solomon, King of Israel, and the Queen of Sheba. Written and directed by J. Gordon Edwards, it starred Betty Blythe as the Queen and Fritz Leiber, Sr. as King Solomon. The film is well known amongst silent film buffs for the risqué costumes worn by Blythe, as evidenced by several surviving stills taken during the production. This was a rarity in mainstream Hollywood films at the time. Only a short fragment of the film survives.

 

 

Crystal Cove Early Film Set

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From “The First 100 Years in Laguna Beach 1876-1976″ by Merle and Mabel Ramsey

The Postman Always RIngs Twice, 1946 version, was partially filmed in Laguna Beach. Director Tay Garnett wanted to shoot in as many actual locations as possible for the movie, a rarity for MGM at the time. For the seaside love scenes, he took the cast and crew to Laguna Beach, where a fog made shooting impossible for days. After a few days, they moved to San Clemente in search of clearer skies, only to have fog roll in there as well. Then word got to them that the fog had lifted at Laguna Beach. By the time they got back there, however, it had returned.

The strain of waiting for the fog to lift caused the director, who had suffered from drinking problems in the past, to fall off the wagon. Garnett holed himself up in his hotel room, where nobody could get him to stop drinking. Concerned about rumors that he was going to be replaced, Garfield and Turner decided to visit him on their own. Garfield could get nowhere with him, but Turner managed to convince him to go back to Los Angeles for treatment. When he returned a week later, the fog lifted, and they all went back to work.

Another result of the location delays was a brief affair between Garfield and Turner, according to Garfield’s friend, Warner Bros. director Vincent Sherman. He said Turner was the only co-star with whom Garfield ever became romantically involved. There had been sparks between the two since the first day of shooting, and the delays had sparked a close friendship. Finally, they shared a moonlit tryst on the beach but that was their only night together. The two realized that whatever was happening on-screen, off-screen they had no sexual chemistry together. They remained friends nonetheless.
*TCM Frank Miller

Lana Turner and John Garfield with unknown soldier, in Laguna. Photo possibly by Ed Hobart (LB lifeguard, Police Officer, Journalist) and father to Carolyn Hobert Fisch.image063

John Garfield & Lana Turner: Woods Cove, during the filming of “The Postman Always Rings Twice” *Aug 1945

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Sterling Holloway: the voice of Winnie the Pooh, The Cheshire Cat in Alice In Wonderland, the Stork in Dumbo and many others, lived in 3 Arch Bay.

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La Casa del Camino quickly became a local favorite for the former Hollywood elite when it opened in 1929, making it a perfect coastal destination.

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Marlo Thomas”, Laguna Playhouse

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